The Lust List – Beaver Creek’s Most Expensive Listing

Beaver Creek is no stranger to top-dollar listings, but the ski area’s most expensive listing clocks in at $21,950,000 with a whole lot of amenities. The 6 bedrooms and 9 bathrooms are a standard number for a 9,824-square-foot house, but few ski country listings come with a 4.24 acre lot. That’s a lot of land, and this property benefits from both a large lawn area and surrounding forests.

Beaver Creek Listing - Interior Living Room
Beaver Creek Listing – Interior Living Room
Beaver Creek Listing - Interior Master Bedroom
Beaver Creek Listing – Interior Master Bedroom

Located in the gated Mountain Star neighborhood, the house was designed to resemble mountain peaks and also boasts a massive fireplace, large patio, hot tub, movie theater room, gym, and wine cellar.

Beaver Creek Listing - Interior Wine Celler
Beaver Creek Listing – Interior Wine Celler

Throw in some of the best views in the Vail Valley and access to the surrounding national forest and it just might be the perfect mountain retreat.

Beaver Creek Listing - Interior Stairway
Beaver Creek Listing – Interior Stairway
Beaver Creek Listing - Exterior
Beaver Creek Listing – Exterior

Beaver Creek $22MM Listing

Paul Rudolph’s Magical Modernist Box

Paul Rudolph’s Walker Guest House on Sanibel Island (1952-53) is a magical modernist box essential for understanding Rudolph and midcentury modernism. In 1952, Dr. Walter Walker of Minneapolis asked Rudolph to build a small guest house on Sanibel Island, intended as a pendant to a larger house already designed by Rudolph (that was never built). Rudolph delivered a unique design: a 576-square-foot lightweight box made of wood posts and beams painted white; glazed with wall-sized windows and screens; enclosed by large square panels; and raised on a 24-by-24-foot platform. Rudolph captured its animated, tensile character when he later said of the house, “It crouches like a spider in the sand.”

Most remembered for his controversial, large-scale Brutalist buildings of the 1960s, Rudolph (1918-97) first achieved international acclaim in the late 1940s and early 1950s for a series of widely published, structurally expressive beach houses he designed in Sarasota, Florida, with Ralph Twitchell (1890-1978). The houses were experimental, using new materials, such as plastics and plywoods. Rudolph saw the houses as opportunities to explore and question the rules of modern architecture in order to find his own unique means of expression.

Walker Guest House Exterior
Walker Guest House Exterior

Controlled by an ingenious, sailboat-like rigging system, the adjustable panels acted as giant shutters that could shade and protect the house’s transparent expanses from sun and rain. Hinged at the top rather than the side, the shutters were abstracted versions of the hurricane shutters found throughout the Caribbean. The shutters were counterbalanced by ball-shaped, iron weights. Painted red, they gave the house its joyful, toy-like character. The Walker family vacationed in the guest house during the winter and affectionately called it “Cannonball.” At the end of the season, they locked the shutters and left the house upon the beach, like a traveler’s trunk waiting to be opened again next winter. They still return to it today.

Walker Guest House Interior
Walker Guest House Interior

A prize-winner (the“Award Bienal de Sao Paulo”) , the Walker House helped catapult Rudolph into the chairmanship of the Yale Department of Architecture by 1957, where he influenced an entire generation of students, among them Norman Foster, Richard Rogers and Robert A. M. Stern. A model both local and universal, the lightweight, box-like Walker House was undoubtedly a prototype for his prefabricated dwellings of the 1960s, which he tempered with sensitivity for locale learned from Florida.

Paul Walker designed guest house on Sanibel Island
Paul Walker designed guest house on Sanibel Island

Rock Reach House

The Rock Reach House juts out of the rocky landscape like a modernist fever dream. Built using an innovative light-gauge steel system, this short-term rental house sits not far from Joshua Tree National Park. Each of the two bedrooms has its own private patio, enabling guests to soak in the views of the surrounding rocks, juniper, and desert oak trees, and for an actual soak, there’s also a hot tub and outdoor shower. Back indoors, you’ll find a high-end kitchen, a handsome living room, and wi-fi, and when it’s time to unplug, you can enjoy the cool night air from the warmth of the wood-burning fireplace.

Rock Reach House was profiled in the April 2010 issue of Dwell magazine and is the first house built by Blue Sky Building Systems using the Blue Sky Frame®, a revolutionary light-gauge steel frame system.

Rock Reach House
Rock Reach House near Joshua Tree
Rock Reach House
Rock Reach House near Joshua Tree
Rock Reach House
Rock Reach House near Joshua Tree
Rock Reach House
Rock Reach House near Joshua Tree

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.rockreachhouse.com/