Bentley Continental GT Speed Black Edition

Ditching the standard edition’s chrome brightwork for glossy black, the Bentley Continental GT Speed Black Edition gives the sporty tourer a little extra edge. The new Black Edition offers a host of striking color schemes that visually embody the GT Speed’s phenomenal performance. Based on the 2016 model, it gets the same upgraded 6.0L twin-turbo W12 producing 642 hp, good enough to move it from 0-60 in just 3.9 seconds and hit a top speed of over 200 mph. 21-inch black wheels match the other accents, as well as the carbon fiber of the interior fascia, center, and roof consoles, while a handful of contrast colors — including an eye-catching Cyber Yellow — can be applied to the front splitters, side skirts, leather accents, and interior stitching.

With its lower ride height, the Black Edition feels even faster – and it looks faster, too. The brightware – which includes headlight and grille surrounds, lower body side strips and door handles – is no longer chrome, but has instead been finished in a brooding, evocative black, with all-black 21″ 5-Spoke Directional Sports wheels to match.

This vibrant look runs seamlessly throughout the cabin – exhilaration and elegance co-existing in one sumptuous space. The sports steering wheel features contrast stitching and is hand-upholstered to match the Mulliner Design Seats and the satin finish Carbon Fibre fascia and console.

Bentley Continental GT Speed Black Edition
Bentley Continental GT Speed Black Edition

1958 Porsche 356 A Speedster

1958 Porsche 356 A Speedster
1958 Porsche 356 A Speedster

Porsche’s iconic 356 Speedster has long been one of my favorite cars – partially due to the styling (I love a ragtop) and partially due to its democratic price point. The model first appeared in 1954 after U.S. distributor Max Hoffman convinced the factory that it needed a product with which to compete with lower-cost British imports. What Porsche delivered was a bare-bones roadster with a base price of just under $3,000, which was exactly what Hoffman needed to get customers in the door. Unlike the luxurious 356 Cabriolet, with its fixed windshield and numerous comfort features, the Speedster was very basic, with side curtains instead of roll-up door glass, a removable windshield, ventilated thin-shell non-reclining bucket seats, and little else—though a lot of fun. The exterior of this example is finished in Meisen Blue with a Navy top, while the interior has a matching Meisen Blue dash with correct gauges, a restored Nardi wooden steering wheel, and tan square-weave carpeting.

1958 Porsche 356 A Speedster
1958 Porsche 356 A Speedster
1958 Porsche 356 A Speedster
1958 Porsche 356 A Speedster

 

 

 

 

 

The 356 Speedster was a true dual- purpose sports car. Owners could readily use their Speedsters for everyday transportation and then drive to the track on weekends, remove the bumpers, top, windshield, floor mats, and other trim, tape on some numbers, and go racing. Speedsters offered excellent performance due to their light weight, and they soon established themselves as the cars to beat. Speedsters remained competitive well into the 1970s and 1980s, winning many national championships in the U.S. and Europe.

1958 Porsche 356 A Speedster
1958 Porsche 356 A Speedster

 

1958 Porsche 356 A Speedster
1958 Porsche 356 A Speedster

 

Ode to the Jaguar E-Type

The Jaguar E-Type is the most beautiful, elegant car ever built.

It is one of only six cars in the Museum of Modern Art’s permanent design collection (in 1966, a blue Series 1 roadster).  On its release Enzo Ferrari called it “The most beautiful car ever made.” In 2004, Sports Car International magazine placed the E-Type at number one on their list of Top Sports Cars of the 1960s.

Jaguar E-Type

The Jaguar E-Type (a.k.a. Jaguar XK-E) was manufactured by between 1961 and 1975. Its combination of beauty, high performance, and competitive pricing established the marque as an icon of 1960s motoring. At a time when most cars had drum brakes, live rear axles, and mediocre performance, the XKE sprang on the scene with 150 mph and a sub-7 second 0-60 time, monocoque construction, disc brakes, rack and pinion steering, independent front and rear suspension, and unrivaled looks. 

Jaguar E-Type

Over the course of its production Jaguar produced the E-Type in three different series. The Series 1 was initially designed and shown to the public as a rear-wheel drive grand tourer in two-seater coupé form (FHC or Fixed Head Coupé) and as a two-seater convertible (OTS or Open Two Seater). A “2+2” four-seater version of the coupé, with a lengthened wheelbase, was released several years later.

Series 1

Jaguar E-Type

The Series 1 cars (built between 1961 and 1968 – by far the most valuable) fall into two categories: those made between 1961 and 1964, which had 3.8 litre engines and non-synchromesh transmissions, and those made between 1965-1967, which increased engine size and torque by around 10%, added a fully synchronized transmission, and also provided new reclining seats, an alternator in place of the prior generator and other modern amenities. The 4.2 became the most desirable version of the famous E-Type due to their increased power and usability while retaining the same outward appearance as the earlier cars.

Series 2

Jaguar E-Type Series 2
Jaguar E-Type Series 2

The Series 2 (built between 1968 and 1971) introduced a number of design changes, largely due to U.S. design legislation. The most distinctive exterior feature is the absence of the glass headlight covers. Other hallmarks of Series 2 cars are a wrap-around rear bumper, re-positioned and larger front indicators and tail lights below the bumpers, an enlarged “mouth” which aided cooling but detracted for the Series I design purity, twin electric fans, plastic rocker switches in place of the Series I toggle switches, and, of course most importantly, a material downgrading in performance resulting from a switch from the three SU carburetors used in Series 1 models to a mere two “smogged” Stromberg carbs, reducing horsepower from 265 to 246 and reducing torque from 283 to 263.

Series 3

Jaguar E-Type Series 3
Jaguar E-Type Series 3

The Series 3 (built between 1971 and 1975) introduced a new 5.3 L twelve-cylinder Jaguar V12 engine, uprated brakes and standard power steering. Optionally an automatic transmission, wire wheels and air conditioning was available. The brand new V12 engine was originally developed for the Le Mans series. It was equipped with four Zenith carburetors. The Series 3 is easily identifiable by the large cross-slatted front grille, flared wheel arches, wider tyres, four exhaust tips and a badge on the rear that proclaims it to be a V12.

The New Lightweights

Way back in 1963, Jaguar embarked on a special project. A project to build 18 lightweight, all aluminum GT E-Type destined for racing domination. Jaguar planned to produce 18 units but ultimately only a dozen were built. These are exceedingly rare and sought after by collectors – one sold in early 2015 for more than £5 million.

Determined to complete the project, the craftsmen at Jaguar Heritage in Coventry, England, are hand-building the remaining 6. Take a look at the creation of vehicle S850670.

 

 

1962 Aston Martin DB4GT

While the DB5 is more widely known the DB4GT is more sought after by collectors. This model was the 14th of just 19 DB4 GT’s tailor-made by Italian shop Zagato to be lighter and more nimble than its factory counterparts. It was originally delivered to Australia, where it was successfully raced, before being sold to an owner in England who had the vehicle restored to a Concours-winning state by marque specialist Richard Williams and Carrozzeria Zagato.

Aston Martin DB4GT
Aston Martin DB4GT

Aston Martin approached Zagato to modify the DB4GT to help it maintain its competitiveness against Ferrari in the World Sports Car Championships in the early 1960s. Aston Martin unveiled the model at the 1960 London Motor Show and it is considered by many to be the coachbuilder’s finest design.

Aston Martin DB4GT
Aston Martin DB4GT

This car will be included in an aution at Sotheby’s on December 10th.This will be the first time in over a decade that a 1962 Aston Martin DB4GT will change hands.

For more information: Aston Martin Zagato.

Aston Martin DB4GT
Aston Martin DB4GT